7 Simple Steps to Make a Child-Safe Home

English: these are 3 leaf clovers, and a flowe...

English: these are 3 leaf clovers, and a flower, that grows with them. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY!!!

Jake at Time after Time has a Sunday Post Challenge…today’s theme is BAY.

The definition of bay is a cove or broad inlet of sea where the land curves inward. Many settlements were originally built on the land surrounding a bay because the safe harbor attracted ships that could bring needed goods.

Stuart Van Gogh 006

My husband loves to paint pictures with bays.

Bay pictures give us a sense of peace and calm.

As a bay provides shelter for boats, a home should provide safe haven for a child.

What makes a safe home? There are many factors.

Here are seven simple steps you can take to make your home safer for your child.

  • Keep medicines, cleaning supplies and other poisons in locked cabinets
  • Never leave children alone in the bathroom or tub…even for a minute
  • Check toys carefully for sharp edges and small pieces
  • Use toddler gates at the top and bottom of stairs
  • Use window guards and open windows from the top
  • If you have guns in the house, keep them UNLOADED and LOCKED UP
  • Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove and use back burners for cooking

For more safety information:

http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/kids/home-safety/child-safety-keeping-your-home-safe-for-your-baby.html

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/making_your_home_safe_for_your_child.html

Many local community organizations can assist parents in making their home safer.  Please don’t be afraid or ashamed to reach out and ask for help…your child is worth it!

Keeping your child safe is the number one priority of parenting. Parents also want to provide educational fun-filled activities for their kids.

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Join in the fun with Jake’s Sunday Post.

http://jakesprinters.wordpress.com/

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day…Catherine Johnson is having a limerick contest. Check out her link to see the rules and prize: http://catherinemjohnson.wordpress.com/2013/03/17/st-patricks-day-limericks/

Celebrate St. Patrick’s day by writing a limerick of your own…I did…here’s my entry:

When Greenie McTurnips would sing,

Her listeners ear plugs would bring.

They told her to STOP!

Her career to swap.

Now picture book writing’s her thing.

How to recognize if your child is being bullied…9News Report

I just got back from the 9NEWS TV studio in Denver and wanted to share with you the piece we did on bullying.

Here’s the link to the video clip of the show…it’s only 3 minutes long…but packed with critical info on bullying: http://www.9news.com/video/default.aspx?bctid=1808390606001

With the new school year just getting underway, kids need to be prepared with more than just a new outfit and a shiny backpack!  Parents also need to be aware of the subtle signs of bullying and what they should do if they suspect a bullying problem.

Bullying is a problem that has been around forever…but the effects on our children seem to have intensified, especially with texting and social media available to the bullies.

How to recognize if your child is being bullied

 Written by

Physical bullying at school, as depicted in th...

Physical bullying at school, as depicted in the film Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

–>KUSA – Denver Public Schools started back on Monday. Even though many kids are excited to see friends who were gone over the summer, some children are dreading returning to school due to bullying.

So, how do you know if your child is being bullied if they won’t tell you? Vivian Kirkfield joined 9NEWS at 8 a.m. on Monday to discuss some warning signs that your child may be a victim of a bully.

“There are a couple of subtle signs, and some not-so-subtle,” Kirkfield said. “One of them would be a child coming home scratched or bruised. Another might be a child coming home with belongings missing, like their new bookbag is gone, a jacket or some of their books perhaps.”

Kirkfield says another sign may be your child not wanting to take the bus to school or are walking a different route to school. But the signs may not just be from your child returning or going to school. The issues may permeate into family relations also.

“Maybe they always gotten along with siblings and now, all of the sudden, they are fighting with brothers and sisters,” Kirkfield said. “Maybe they are having trouble sleeping … or bad dreams.”

Kirkfield says sudden complaints of health conditions like a headache or a stomach ache may be a sign too.

“Although all of those symptoms could be caused by other problems, a parent really needs to be sensitive to it and act upon it,” Kirkfield said.

A lot of times, a school will notice a problem on a playground and give parents a heads up. However, if that’s not the case, how does a parent confront their kid about possible bullying?

“Most of the time, children do not want to talk about the bullying because either they’re embarrassed or they’re afraid,” Kirkfield said. “Maybe they’ve been told ‘I’m really going to beat you up,’ or ‘kill your brother.’ Parents can speak with their child and ask direct questions such as ‘Is somebody bothering you at school?’ And ask indirect questions such as ‘Is there anybody at school you don’t like?'”

Kirkfield says a child might be much more willing to talk about something like that than to come straight out and admit they are being bullied.

“Even after your child doesn’t come out and say it … definitely talk to the school staff,” Kirkfield said. “Talk with your child’s teacher, with the child’s principal, guidance counselor, because they are there. Police really need to form that connection with the school early on, even if there isn’t a problem with bullying.”

Kirkfield says parents need to stay involved in their child’s school.