A Christmas Memory

 

 

Deutsch: Apfelkuchen English: Apple pie

Image via Wikipedia

 

One of the best things about blogging is reading the posts of others.

There are some really super cool writers out in the blogosphere.

I meet new friends and learn new things all the time.

The other day, I discovered Things I Want to Tell My Mother, heartfelt posts written by a woman whose mother has Alzheimer’s.  Please take the time to visit her blog, especially if you are a mother or a daughter…you will be glad you did.

Marylin, the author of that wonderful blog, is having a contest and is asking for posts of one hundred words on Christmas memories with your mother or grandmother.  Since I lived with my grandmother for many years, my Christmas memory will be about this special lady who was a role model for positive parental participation long before spending quality time with young children was considered crucial to building self-esteem.

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Baking for Christmas

            As soon as I opened my eyes that morning, I knew it was going to be a special day.  The delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon filled the little bedroom I shared with my older sister.  This was the day before Christmas, and although my parents and sister were still sleeping, I knew that someone was already awake.  I tiptoed down the stairs and entered the old-fashioned kitchen. My grandmother’s words were welcoming and her flour-dusted arms enfolded me in a loving hug. “There you are, Vivian.  I’ve been waiting for you.  Come and help me make these apple pies.”

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Memories like this one encouraged me to use cooking activities with my own children, the children in my daycare and as part of the self-esteem building activities in Show Me How!  Allowing kids to help prepare food builds true self-esteem as they master tasks and skills in the kitchen.  It also encourages fussy eaters to try new foods…if a child has helped prepare a meal; he or she is more likely to eat it.  Or, at least try it.  Here’s a cool tip: my niece who is a clinical psychologist, encourages her children to take a “no thank you” bite of every food that is being served.  They know that if they really don’t like it, they can try it and say, “no thank you” and they won’t have to finish the portion.  Experts say that it takes at least seven tries before we develop a taste for certain foods…so just because a child doesn’t like something the first time he tries it, doesn’t mean you should never serve it. 

I’ve got several school and library programs coming up this week and next and I am really excited about sharing the picture book stories and craft projects from Show Me How!  This is a back-to-basics program that builds self-esteem, develops better literacy skills and strengthens the parent-child connection.

 

Please pass the word and help others get on the back-to-basics bandwagon.  This will definitely be the gift that keeps on giving, long after many of the toys you buy have been discarded.

NO BATTERIES REQUIRED…POWERED BY YOUR CHILD’S IMAGINATION

SHOW ME HOW!  NOW ONLY $19.95