Perfect Picture Book Friday: MY FOOTPRINTS

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, dear friends! I’m coming to you today to share a very special picture book that is part of Multicultural Children’s Book Day which is celebrated this year on January 31st.

The founders of MCBD, authors Mia Wenjen and Valarie Budayr, are all about diversity, and inclusion and making sure that all kids have books they can relate to, books they can see themselves in. I’ve been a proud sponsor of MCBD for several years and I love the books that they feature.

MY FOOTPRINTS

Written by Bao Phi

Illustrated by Basia Tran

Published by Capstone Press (September 2019)

Grades K-4

Themes: family, bullying, diversity

Synopsis: From Amazon:

Every child feels different in some way, but Thuy feels “double different.” She is Vietnamese American and she has two moms. Thuy walks home one winter afternoon, angry and lonely after a bully’s taunts. Then a bird catches her attention and sets Thuy on an imaginary exploration. What if she could fly away like a bird? What if she could sprint like a deer, or roar like a bear? Mimicking the footprints of each creature in the snow, she makes her way home to the arms of her moms. Together, the three of them imagine beautiful and powerful creatures who always have courage – just like Thuy.

Why I love this book:

  • I love stories that help the child reader find new ways to deal with bullying
  • I love when diversity is a thread that is woven skillfully into the story
  • The illustrations and color palette are wonderful

RELATED ACTIVITIES

Photo courtesy: https://www.craftymorning.com/adorable-footprint-crafts-kids/

There are so many footprint crafts…for detailed instructions on these https://www.craftymorning.com/adorable-footprint-crafts-kids/

Take a walk in the woods, park, or even around the neighborhood with your kids – what signs can you find that animals have been around? Footprints, poop, dropped feathers, etc.

MY FOOTPRINTS is only one of the many wonderful diverse books that will be featured for Multicultural Children’s Book Day. I was gifted this book to review it for the event – how lucky is that!

 

 

Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2020 (1/31/20) is in its 7th year! This non-profit children’s literacy initiative was founded by Valarie Budayr and Mia Wenjen; two diverse book-loving moms who saw a need to shine the spotlight on all of the multicultural books and authors on the market while also working to get those book into the hands of young readers and educators.

Seven years in, MCBD’s mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in homes and school bookshelves continues.

MCBD 2020  is honored to have the following Medallion Sponsors on board

 

Super Platinum

Make A Way Media/ Deirdre “DeeDee” Cummings,

Platinum

Language Lizard, Pack-N-Go Girls,

Gold

Audrey Press, Lerner Publishing Group, KidLit TV, ABDO BOOKS : A Family of Educational Publishers, PragmaticMom & Sumo Jo, Candlewick Press,

Silver

Author Charlotte Riggle, Capstone Publishing, Guba Publishing, Melissa Munro Boyd & B is for Breathe,

Bronze

Author Carole P. Roman, Snowflake Stories/Jill Barletti, Vivian Kirkfield & Making Their Voices Heard. Barnes Brothers Books,  TimTimTom, Wisdom Tales Press, Lee & Low Books,  Charlesbridge Publishing, Barefoot Books Talegari Tales

 

Author Sponsor Link Cloud

Jerry Craft, A.R. Bey and Adventures in Boogieland, Eugina Chu & Brandon goes to Beijing, Kenneth Braswell & Fathers Incorporated, Maritza M. Mejia & Luz del mes_Mejia, Kathleen Burkinshaw & The Last Cherry Blossom, SISSY GOES TINY by Rebecca Flansburg and B.A. Norrgard, Josh Funk and HOW TO CODE A ROLLERCOASTER, Maya/Neel Adventures with Culture GrooveLauren Ranalli, The Little Green Monster: Cancer Magic! By Dr. Sharon Chappell, Phe Lang and Me On The Page, Afsaneh Moradian and Jamie is Jamie, Valerie Williams-Sanchez and Valorena Publishing, TUMBLE CREEK PRESS, Nancy Tupper Ling, Author Gwen Jackson, Angeliki Pedersen & The Secrets Hidden Beneath the Palm Tree, Author Kimberly Gordon Biddle, BEST #OWNVOICES CHILDREN’S BOOKS: My Favorite Diversity Books for Kids Ages 1-12 by Mia Wenjen, Susan Schaefer Bernardo & Illustrator Courtenay Fletcher (Founders of Inner Flower Child Books), Ann Morris & Do It Again!/¡Otra Vez!, Janet Balletta and Mermaids on a Mission to Save the Ocean, Evelyn Sanchez-Toledo & Bruna Bailando por el Mundo\ Dancing Around the World, Shoumi Sen & From The Toddler Diaries, Sarah Jamila Stevenson, Tonya Duncan and the Sophie Washington Book Series, Teresa Robeson  & The Queen of Physics, Nadishka Aloysius and Roo The Little Red TukTuk, Girlfriends Book Club Baltimore & Stories by the Girlfriends Book Club, Finding My Way Books, Diana Huang & Intrepids, Five Enchanted Mermaids, Elizabeth Godley and Ribbon’s Traveling Castle, Anna Olswanger and Greenhorn, Danielle Wallace & My Big Brother Troy, Jocelyn Francisco and Little Yellow Jeepney, Mariana Llanos & Kutu, the Tiny Inca Princess/La Ñusta Diminuta, Sara Arnold & The Big Buna Bash, Roddie Simmons & Race 2 Rio, DuEwa Frazier & Alice’s Musical Debut, Veronica Appleton & the Journey to Appleville book series  Green Kids Club, Inc.

We’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.

Co-Hosts and Global Co-Hosts

A Crafty Arab, Afsaneh Moradian, Agatha Rodi Books, All Done Monkey, Barefoot Mommy, Bethany Edward & Biracial Bookworms, Michelle Goetzl & Books My Kids Read, Crafty Moms Share, Colours of Us, Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes, Educators Spin on it, Shauna Hibbitts-creator of eNannylink, Growing Book by Book, Here Wee Read, Joel Leonidas & Descendant of Poseidon Reads {Philippines}, Imagination Soup, Kid World Citizen, Kristi’s Book Nook, The Logonauts, Mama Smiles, Miss Panda Chinese, Multicultural Kid Blogs, Serge Smagarinsky {Australia}, Shoumi Sen, Jennifer Brunk & Spanish Playground, Katie Meadows and Youth Lit Reviews

FREE RESOURCES from Multicultural Children’s Book Day

TWITTER PARTY! Register here!

Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld.

I’m also a Bronze Sponsor of the event.

I hope you’ll check out Multicultural Children’s Book Day…and take advantage of the wonderful FREE teacher materials they provide on their website…you’ll find some of the links above.

Also, the NF Fest Registration is open…please don’t miss this opportunity to receive a link to an informative blog post every day via email for the whole month of February…great topics for anyone writing or thinking about writing nonfiction for kids. My post comes up on February 17: Crafting a True Story When Information is Scarce. Andt the other posts are fabulous:  www.nffest.com.

Plus, for more wonderful picture book reviews, please hop over to Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Book Friday post.

And just in case any of you are in the Nashua, New Hampshire area tomorrow, Saturday, January 18 at 11am…I hope you’ll hop over to the Barnes and Noble for the launch of MAKING THEIR VOICES HEARD: THE INSPIRING FRIENDSHIP OF ELLA FITZGERALD AND MARILYN MONROE (Little Bee Books, illustrated by Alleanna Harris). I’ll be reading the story and signing books! Woo-hoo! And then I leave for a month in Chicago…and more bookstore and school activities…I’m hoping to connect with some of you in the Chicagoland area.

Have a wonderful weekend. Stay safe and stay warm, my friends.

 

 

Perfect Picture Book Friday: LIZZIE DEMANDS A SEAT Plus Giveaway of PB Critique or Book

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, dear friends! I already know that today’s selection is going to be one of my favorite picture books of 2020 – the author, the talented Beth Anderson, is one of my critique buddies and I saw the early drafts of this story and loved it then. As most of you know, nonfiction pb bios are near and dear to my heart…and this one is about Elizabeth Jennings who fought for the right to ride the streetcars in New York City. And guess what? This amazing author is offering a giveaway and the winner gets to choose either a copy of the book OR a Picture Book Manuscript Critique…WOW! Please make sure you leave a comment to get your entry. And then, before you go on to your other activities, check out the other wonderful books on review over at Susanna Hill’s Perfect Picture Book Friday post.

LIZZIE DEMANDS A SEAT! Elizabeth Jennings Fights for Streetcar Rights

Written by Beth Anderson

Illustrated by E.B. Lewis

Published by Cawkins Creek/Boyds Mills Press/Kane (January 2020)

Ages: 7-10

Themes: Discrimination, Courage, Civil Rights

Synopsis: From Amazon:

In 1854, Elizabeth “Lizzie” Jennings, an African American schoolteacher, fought back when she was unjustly denied entry to a New York City streetcar, sparking the beginnings of the long struggle to gain equal rights on public transportation.

One hundred years before Rosa Parks took her stand, Elizabeth “Lizzie” Jennings tried to board a streetcar in New York City on her way to church. Though there were plenty of empty seats, she was denied entry, assaulted, and threatened all because of her race–even though New York was a free state at that time. Lizzie decided to fight back. She told her story, took her case to court–where future president Chester Arthur represented her–and won! Her victory was the first recorded in the fight for equal rights on public transportation, and Lizzie’s case set a precedent. Author Beth Anderson and acclaimed illustrator E. B. Lewis bring this inspiring, little-known story to life in this captivating book.”

Why I love this book:

  • Powerful text brings history alive for young readers
  • I love that this little known event is brought to life – who would have imagined that 100 years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat, Elizabeth Jennings had already sued…and won…for the right to ride on a streetcar with white folks.
  • Captivating illustrations will engage kids – and keep them turning the pages

Here are a few of the STARRED reviews:

  •  “Anderson’s third-person text allows readers under Lizzie’s skin… Lewis’ dappled watercolors depict the action and extend it.  A two-page author’s note fleshes out the history, including mentions of Claudette Colvin and Rosa Parks. Necessary.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review
  • “Anderson’s vivid, well-researched narrative includes dialogue that “closely follows” accounts of Jennings’ experience that appeared in newspapers at the time. Using brighter hues than his usual palette, Lewis creates a series of vibrant, expressive watercolor paintings that transports viewers back in time, while portraying characters as distinct individuals. A memorable picture book introducing a nineteenth-century defender of civil rights.” — Booklist, starred review
  • “…(T)he first victory in what would become a 100-year-long battle to end segregation on public transportation. Shimmering jewel-toned watercolors blur and delineate details in Lewis’s paintings.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

RELATED ACTIVITIES

There are many activities that parents and teachers can use to help promote racial and cultural awareness – the idea is NOT to ignore the differences among people, but to EMBRACE the differences. Ignoring the differences is like saying that the art of Picasso is the same as the art of Rembrandt. We can help children observe and appreciate different shades of skin and different textures of hair.

I found the following abstract – and although it may seem dated by the year it was created, I feel it gives a true picture of how young children perceive racial differences and it offers some really concrete activities that might promote inclusivity.

Children develop their identity and attitudes through experiences with their bodies, social environments, and their cognitive developmental stages (Derman-Sparks, 1989). As these three factors interact, young children progress through certain stages of racial and cultural awareness. In this article, we’ll talk first about the stages of racial awareness. Then we’ll give you some ideas for activities that will help children accept themselves and others.

When does it start?

The foundation of self-awareness is laid when children are infants and toddlers. At these stages, children learn “what is me” and “what is not me.” Toddlers are sensitive to the feelings of the adults around them, and they begin to mimic adult behavior. By age two, children recognize and explore physical differences. They are also learning the names of colors, and they begin to apply this to skin color. Natural curiosity will lead to questions about differences.

dancing kids5THE PRESCHOOL YEARS (age 3 and 4). Children of this age are better at noticing differences among people. They have learned to classify, and they tend to sort based on color and size. They can’t yet deal with multiple classification, so they get confused about the names of racial groups and the actual color of their skin. They wonder why two people with different skin tones are considered part of the same racial group. Many preschool children will comment – in words or through actions – on hair texture, eye shape, and other physical characteristics. They want to know how people got their color, hair texture, and eye shape.

Children at this age believe that because other parts of their body grow and change, skin color and other physical traits could also change. Some young black children prefer white dolls over black dolls (Clark, 1963). More often than white children, they may say that they don’t like their skin color, hair texture, or another physical trait. By age four, children begin to prefer one race.

At this age, children’s thinking is limited, distorted, and inconsistent. For these reasons, it is easy for them to believe stereotypes and form pre-prejudices. In the Anti-Bias Curriculum (1989), Louise Derman-Sparks states, “The goals are to facilitate children’s awareness that their racial identity does not change, to help them understand that they are part of a large group with similar characteristics (not “different” from everyone else) and to foster their desire to be exactly who they are.”

KINDERGARTEN (age 5 and 6). Kindergartners continue to ask questions about physical differences, and they can begin to understand the explanations for these differences. They can now make distinctions between members of the same racial or cultural group. At this age, children are developing social skills and becoming more group-oriented. They enjoy exploring the culture of their friends. By age six, most children understand the concept of fair and unfair, and they often use these concepts as they try to deal with issues.

child playsTHE EARLY PRIMARY YEARS (age 7 and 8). At this age, children acquire racial constancy. They now understand that a person’s skin color will not wash off or change but will remain the same as she grows up. At this age, children can also consider multiple attributes at one time. They can now understand how one person can be a member of several different groups. For example, a person can be part of a family, a classroom, a culture, and a race.

Children can also understand feelings of shame and pride at this age, and they are aware of racism against their own group. They are able to empathize, and they are interested in learning about the world. It’s the perfect time for giving them accurate information so they grow out of “preschool” ways of thinking (York, 1991).

Now that you understand how children develop their racial and cultural awareness and identities, it’s time to encourage them to accept and celebrate their differences. We want to help all children develop a positive self-concept and feel proud of who they are – although we don’t want them to feel better than other groups, either! If this positive sense of self and others is allowed to flourish, today’s children will become adults who accept and affirm differences, identify unfair situations, and strive to eliminate racism of any sort. A first step in helping children feel positive about racial and cultural identity is reflecting diversity in their surroundings. Children notice when the only dolls there are to play with don’t look anything like them. Books and toys that reflect racial and cultural diversity serve two purposes. They not only help children of color feel good about themselves, they help all children feel positive about differences. Here are some ideas you can try.

– Remove materials and visuals that promote stereotypes.

– Display images of all the children and families in your program.

– If your group is not diverse, display images of diversity in your community or in U.S. society.

– Add toys and materials that reflect the cultures of the children and families in your group. Then expand to include materials that mirror the diversity in the world.

Activities for Preschoolers

Skin-Color Match-Ups

Set out a number of nylon knee-high stockings in various shades, tan, black, white, pink, yellow, and red. Encourage children to try them on their hands and arms or their legs and feet. Ask questions to help the children increase their awareness of skin color. For example, “Can you find a stocking that is the same color as your skin?” Or “What color is that stocking you have on your arm?” Ask the children to “Try the _________ stocking. Is it lighter or darker than your own skin?” Tell the children no one’s skin color is really white, pink, yellow, or red. Emphasize that skin-color differences are interesting and desirable.

Hair

Ask parents to give you a tiny bit of hair from each child. If parents cannot do this, use photographs of different hairstyles and hair-care products for the children to use, explore, and talk about. If parents do give you the hair, paste the hair from each child on a 3″ x 5″ index card, put them in a box, and ask the children to identify each bit of hair. Talk about how hair has texture and curl. For instance, some people have fine hair while others have coarse hair. Some people have straight hair, and others have curly hair. Talk about how people have different hair colors and lengths. Take a photo of each child’s face and make a collage of different hairstyles.

Music and Dance

Ask parents to lend you recordings of music that their family enjoys. Teach the children songs and dances from different nations of the world. Children will begin to see that all people like to sing and dance, but every group has its own special ways of doing it. Talk with the children about how different music sounds: loud, soft, fast, or slow. Listen for the different instruments. Again, ask parents if they have any instruments children could listen to or try.

Activities for School-Age Children

Alike and Different (Thumbprints)

Set out white 3″ x 5″ cards, a black ink pad, a pen, and a magnifying glass. Ask the children to make prints of their thumbs by pressing them on the ink pad and then on the cards. Label each print with the child’s name. Let children use the magnifying glass to see how the prints are alike and different. Point out that everyone has patterns on the skin of their fingers and each person’s fingerprints are different from anyone else’s.

Reprinted with permission from the National Network for Child Care – NNCC. Biles, B. (1994). Activities that promote racial and cultural awareness. In Todd, C.M. (Ed.), *Family child care connections*, 4(3), pp. 1­p;4. Urbana-Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Cooperative Extension Service.

Please join me in celebrating Beth’s wonderful new book – the best way to do that is to

  • Buy a copy of the book
  • Review the book on Amazon/Goodreads/or other review sites
  • Tell your friends about the book
  • Ask your local library to purchase a copy for their shelves

Thank you for spending your precious time here – I hope you all have a wonderful weekend…and if you have a few more minutes, please hop over to Beth’s blog where I stopped by to share some thoughts, plus I’m offering a giveaway for her Mining for Heart series: The Voice of Heart.

Also, don’t forget to leave a comment here to be entered in the giveaway of the winner’s choice of either a copy of LIZZIE DEMANDS A SEAT or a PB manuscript critique from the amazing Beth Anderson! And remember…if you share on social media, you get an extra ticket in the giveaway hat…the more you share, the more chances you’ll have!

Perfect Picture Book Friday: ONE HUG

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, my friends. We got another double-header for you this weekend. Today: ONE HUG. Tomorrow: a Q&A with the author, the lovely Katrina Moore!  I’ve been really busy, getting prepared for the Hawaii SCBWI webinar tomorrow – there is still time to sign up (and no, unfortunately, I won’t be IN sunny tropical Hawaii – I will be delivering my presentation remotely…from cold and cloudy New Hampshire) …I hope some of you will be tuning in to hear me and Little Bee editor Courtney Fahy share some important info about Writing Nonfiction. https://hawaii.scbwi.org/events/nonfiction-webinar-with-author-vivian-kirkfield-and-editor-courtney-fahy-of-little-bee-books/

But in the meantime, I’m so glad you are here, because I am ready to give you all ONE HUG!

OneHugCoverONE HUG

Written by Katrina Moore

Illustrated by Julia Woolf

Published by Katherine Tegen Books (2019)

Ages: 3 and up

Theme:

Synopsis: From Amazon:

“Told in joyful rhymes and bright illustrations, One Hug celebrates the many ways we embrace our loved ones.

As a family wakes up to begin preparing for the arrival of their immigrant relatives, the littlest girl begins to feel left out and nervous. But an encouraging brother and the welcoming arms of her grandma help end the day with a belly full of food, jars full of fireflies, and all in cozy, snuggly slumber.

From the dazzling talents of debut author Katrina Moore and illustrator Julia Woolf comes a fun, cuddly story that reminds readers how one simple hug can go a long, happy way. A perfect read-aloud to share in classrooms or at bedtime!

Soft and strong, warm and snug,
What’s your favorite way to hug?
Mom will SQUEEZE you like a bear;
Dad will WHOOSH you through the air!”

 

What I love about this book:

  • A perfect bedtime or anytime story
  • Sweet illustrations that will tug at your heartstrings
  • I love a rhyming story – especially one that’s done well

RELATED ACTIVITIES

Hug Coupon Booklet

Blow A Kiss: Book Review and Craft Activity for Kids

This is the actual Valentine my oldest son created for me in 1989 – complete with HUG PASS!

Blow A Kiss: Book Review and Craft Activity for KidsThis is a Hugs and Kisses Coupon Book each of my kindergarten students made for their parents many long years ago.

All you need: Paper, scissors, crayons/markers.

Sometimes when children seem unlovable, that is when they need the most love. Making the Hug passes might be just the activity to start an important discussion or, when a child redeems one of the hug passes, a door of opportunity may be opening for some honest  talk.

I thank you all for stopping by. Please check out Katrina’s new book, ONE HUG...it launches next month, but is available for pre-order right now!!! Make sure you leave a comment and share the post on your social media for a chance to win a copy of this beautiful book. And also, don’t forget to swing by tomorrow for a revealing chat with the author…and a YUMMY recipe for a treat that can’t be beat!!

And if you want to hear my thoughts about WRITING NONFICTION – and listen to some insights from Little Bee editor Courtney Fahy,…and participate in a lively Q&A, don’t waste any time…sign up…the webinar is tomorrow (Saturday, November 16 at 10am Hawaii time/3pm New York time)…if you sign up, you get to view the replay until the end of January…plenty of time, even with the holidays.

https://hawaii.scbwi.org/events/nonfiction-webinar-with-author-vivian-kirkfield-and-editor-courtney-fahy-of-little-bee-books/

scbwi-diversity-banner1

Perfect Picture Book Friday: GIRLS WITH GUTS Plus Very Special Giveaway

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, my friends!

This post is chock full…so hold on to your hats. But before we get to the review of this amazing #mightygirl book, I need to announce some winners of previous giveaways:

A few weeks ago, I reviewed a fabulous parody – GOODNIGHT BUBBALA, written by Shery Haft. Illustrator Jill Weber offered a prize of a copy of the book. And the winner is:

ARLENE SCHENKER!

And we also reviewed a wonderful #STEM picture book by Jenna Grodzicki – I SEE SEAFOOD. And the winner is:

JENNIFER MERRIFIELD!

Plus, we turned the spotlight on Dawn Prochovnic and her books, WHERE DO COWGIRLS GO POTTY and WHERE DO PIRATES GO POTTY. She offered a choice of giveaway…either an ARC of one of her books or a picture book manuscript critique…the winner decides which. And the winner is:

EILEEN MAYO

Congratulations, Arlene and Jennifer and Eileen. We’ll be in touch and make sure you receive your prizes!

Please help me give a huge round of applause to our authors and illustrators! Whether we are reviewing one of their picture books or meeting them during a Q&A, they are always gracious and generous with their time and expertise. And they are providing kids with wonderful books like today’s Perfect Picture Book Friday selection.

:girls with guts

 

GIRLS WITH GUTS: The Road to Breaking Barriers and Bashing Records

Written by Debbie Gonzales

Illustrated by Rebecca Gibbon

Published by Charlesbridge (2019)

Ages: 6-9

Themes: #mightygirls, courage, sports

Synopsis: From Amazon:

No chasing! No stretching or straining! And never, ever sweat. These were the rules girls were forced to play by until Title IX passed in 1972. And it was a game-changer.

A celebration of the strength, endurance, and athleticism of women and girls throughout the ages, Girls With Guts! keeps score with examples of women athletes from the late 1800s up through the 1970s, sharing how women refused to take no for an answer, and how finally, they pushed for a law to protect their right to play, compete, and be athletes.

“I find that this book tells the story of courageous and remarkable women that has brought the opportunities for today’s girls in a positive and fun way even though the fight has not always been easy. But this book captures history in way where the first thought is strength and will of these remarkable ladies.

It is also a good book to remind that it is not that long ago that we were in a very different situation still. A good reminder that even though there are still things and attitudes to change, women’s sport has come a long way to the point we had in Buenos Aires Youth Olympic Games for the first time ever, 50/50 female and male athletes competing!”

—Emma Terho, a multiple-time Olympic and Women’s World Championship bronze medalist

Why I love this book:

  • I love books that provide role models for young kids.
  • I love books that inform and inspire…I learned a lot from this book – I think it has a place in every school library and home bookshelf.
  • The illustrations are fab: A ulous – full of action!

RELATED ACTIVITIES:

podcast avatar - the debcast 5

The Big Kahuna: is a big activity guide for GIRLS WITH GUTS created by author Debbie Gonzales…it’s filled with lots of things to do with kids after you read the book.

I mentioned a VERY SPECIAL GIVEAWAY…Debbie has devoted a whole lot of time and thought to developing her own marketing program to spread the word about her books. And guess what? She’s sharing that with the world. WOW! And she’s offering an hour-long session as a giveaway to one lucky winner. Here’s a bit about what she has accomplished…take it away, Debbie!

DEBBIE:  I’d like to expound on the notion that “there are lots of ways to establish visibility that don’t feel icky and that are actually fun to do”.  For a year and a half before GIRLS WITH GUTS was published, I immersed myself in all things marketing. I read scads of books written by relationship marketing gurus – Micheal Hyatt, Tim Grahl, Derek Sivers, and Jeff Walker to name just a few. While doing so, the thought stuck me that others might like to know about things I’ve learned. As a result, I produced two online courses that were very well-received. And, much to my delight, these efforts paid off! Not only have I established a program based on the principles the gurus presented, the prelaunch sales numbers for my book were phenomenal! It worked!

Currently, I’m developing a program in which I coach authors how to gain clarity, focus, and the skills required to enhance visibility in the kidlit marketplace. The premise for this program is founded on building thoughtful personal and online relationships. To achieve this, we explore options that align with one’s digital skill set and circles of influence. Then, we discover avenues of opportunity to develop a publicity platform that feels authentic and sincere.  The process is remarkably painless. It’s true!

As a giveaway, I’d like to offer an hour-long strategy session during which we will explore options that are just right for you. Enter the drawing and let’s have some visibility platform building fun.

Isn’t that fabulous? Please leave a comment and most importantly, please share the post on any social media channels you have. And make sure you come back tomorrow when Debbie stops by to chat with us on Will Write for Cookies – and if you leave a comment and share that post, you get extra chances in the giveaway hat!

I hope you all have a wonderful weekend. Thank you for spending your precious time with us.

 

 

Perfect Picture Book Friday: PORCUPETTE AND MOPPET

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, dear friends! It’s been a really busy week and tomorrow I’ll be helping my daughter celebrate her 40th birthday…oh my goodness…it’s hard to believe it was 40 years ago that we brought that precious bundle of sweetness home.

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Caroline continues to be a most precious light in Continue reading

Perfect Picture Book Friday: I SEE SEAFOOD Plus Giveaway

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, my friends! I really can’t believe it is Friday already…the days are FLYING by, just like the leaves from the trees!

But no worries! We’ve got a super cool book today to review and a generous giveaway from author Jenna Grodzicki.

But before we dive in, we have a giveaway winner to announce. A couple of weeks ago, my fabulous illustrator for Making Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe, Alleanna Harris, offered an original sketch.  And the winner is:

Pamela Harrison!

Congratulations, Pamela…I will be in touch with you shortly!

And now, back to our regularly scheduled programming. Are you hungry???? Continue reading

Perfect Picture Book Friday: SOLDIER FOR EQUALITY

Happy Perfect Picture Book Friday, dear friends. Today’s selection is from one of my very favorite author/illustrators, Duncan Tonatiuh. And today is also the day that Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Book link up is back in business – so please make sure to hop over to her blog later to discover more wonderful picture book reviews.

But first, we have a book to give away. A couple of weeks ago, we turned the spotlight on Barry Wittenstein and his newest picture book: A PLACE TO LAND: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Speech That Inspired a Nation. And the winner is:

LAURA ROETTIGER

Congratulations, Laura…I will connect you and Barry so he can get a copy of this amazing book out to you.

And now, back to our regularly scheduled program. Perfect Picture Book Friday is a celebration of the picture book genre. About eight years ago, there was a NYTimes article that claimed that picture books were dying out…that most parents of young children wanted to Continue reading